National Anti-vivisection Society

 

National Antivisection Society

Cruelty Free Alternatives

Posted: 27 March 2012. Updated: 3 April 2013



Fragrances

Dolma “We believe that to be truly “cruelty free” a product must not only be entirely free from animal testing but should not contain substances of animals origin. ..We only use ingredients whose safety is well established and test finished products on human volunteers”
(The entire range is vegan)

Lush"Lush is firmly committed to a policy that not only precludes testing its products and ingredients on animals, or engaging with third-party suppliers to do so on their behalf, but that also prohibits buying any ingredient from any supplier that tests any of its materials on any animals for any purpose”
(Vegan products are labelled as such)

Marks & Spencer“We don’t test any of our M&S beauty or household products on animals. But we wanted to go further than this. As part of our Plan A commitments, we guarantee that none of the individual ingredients in our beauty or household products is tested on animals either, starting from a fixed cut-off date of January 2006”.

Neals Yard “We don’t test any of our products on animals and never have. ... we employ an independent company that uses human volunteers to trial new products, to make sure they’re safe and effective”

Next"Next has never carried out any animal testing or commissioned any third party to do so on the brand’s behalf…Next only accepts products made from ingredients where the raw materials have not been tested on animals after a cut-off date of 1998”

Household products

Astonish – Astonish cleaning products have never been tested on animals and do not contain any animal ingredients or derivatives of animals. They do not use suppliers who test on animals.
Website accessed 22nd March 2012

Method – Method performs absolutely no animal testing on any of their products, and does not endorse, request, or commission any animal testing on their behalf. They are trying to make animal testing obsolete and ensure that none of their suppliers do any animal testing on their behalf and have lobbied to gain acceptance for their non-animal product testing protocols from regulatory agencies, retailers, and consumers. For product safety testing they use in-vitro (non-animal) simulated skin and eye irritation tests.
Website accessed 22nd March 2012

Co-op“We commit to continue to take the lead on the opposition to the use of animals for the testing of own-brand toiletries, cosmetics or household cleaning products (or ingredients therein).” The policy is based on a Fixed Cut Off Date of 1985 – that means they will not use ingredients tested after that date. Website accessed 21st February 2013

Waitrose – Waitrose own label household products, i.e. laundry, detergents and domestic cleaning products, are not tested on animals and do not contain any ingredients that have been tested on animals on behalf of Waitrose. They do not test their own label cosmetics, toiletries, baby care or personal care products on animals, nor do they commission others to do so on their behalf. They also operate a strict purchasing rule that ensures that they do not buy any ingredient or product that has been tested on animals for cosmetic purposes by their own-label suppliers since 1990 in the case of Waitrose, and 1996 in the case of John Lewis.
Website accessed 21st March 2012

Tesco – Tesco do not support testing on animals for cosmetic or household products, and do not carry out or commission such tests on their own-brand products or the ingredients they contain. Tesco Naturally and Natural ranges do not use any ingredient that has been tested or retested on animals for cosmetic purposes since 31 December 1990. All other Tesco products operate a fixed cut-off date, for ingredients, of 31 December 2007.
Website accessed 21st March 2012

Marks and Spencer – Marks & Spencer will not test or ask suppliers or any other organisation to test cosmetic products on animals. All cosmetic and household products and ingredients must meet their set fixed cut off date of 1 January 2006.
Website accessed 21st March 2012

Beauty products

Sainbury’s – Sainsbury’s has a policy not to test their own brand cosmetics and toiletries including sun care, skin care, hair care, baby and bath ranges on animals. Website accessed 21st March 2012

Co-op“We commit to continue to take the lead on the opposition to the use of animals for the testing of own-brand toiletries, cosmetics or household cleaning products (or ingredients therein).” The policy is based on a Fixed Cut Off Date of 1985 – that means they will not use ingredients tested after that date. Website accessed 21st February 2013

Waitrose – Waitrose own label household products, i.e. laundry, detergents and domestic cleaning products, are not tested on animals and do not contain any ingredients that have been tested on animals on behalf of Waitrose. They do not test their own label cosmetics, toiletries, baby care or personal care products on animals, nor do they commission others to do so on their behalf. They also operate a strict purchasing rule that ensures that they do not buy any ingredient or product that has been tested on animals for cosmetic purposes by their own-label suppliers since 1990 in the case of Waitrose, and 1996 in the case of John Lewis.
Website accessed 21st March 2012

Tesco – Tesco do not support testing on animals for cosmetic or household products, and do not carry out or commission such tests on their own-brand products or the ingredients they contain. Tesco Naturally and Natural ranges do not use any ingredient that has been tested or retested on animals for cosmetic purposes since 31 December 1990. All other Tesco products operate a fixed cut-off date, for ingredients, of 31 December 2007.
Website accessed 21st March 2012

Superdrug – Superdrug’s entire own brand toiletries product range now guarantees customers that no animal testing has occurred in any part of the product’s manufacturing process.
Website accessed 21st March 2012

Lush – Lush is firmly committed to a policy that not only precludes testing its products and ingredients on animals, or engaging with third-party suppliers to do so on their behalf, but that also prohibits buying any ingredient from any supplier that tests any of its materials on any animals for any purpose. This policy is unique in its field and is pioneering a new way to stop animal tests for cosmetics.
Website accessed 22nd March 2012

Beauty without Cruelty – For over 40 years BWC has been a company with a mission - ethical, cruelty-free products that are made with natural, safe ingredients, which are superior in performance, and are an exceptional value. All BWC color cosmetics are suitable for vegetarians and vegans, and are fragrance free
Website accessed 22nd March 2012

Barry M – Their web-site states that “Barry M Cosmetics have never tested their finished products or ingredients on animals or engaged another company to do so on our behalf. All of our products are suitable for vegetarians but some contain animal by-products (like Beeswax) making them unsuitable for Vegans.”
Website accessed 22nd March 2012

Companies which DO test

L’Oreal“L’Oréal has not tested end products on animals since 1989. However, the authorities in certain countries still demand animal testing in order to register substances marketed in their territories and L’Oréal is obliged to adhere to these national regulations with respect to those of its products manufactured and sold locally.”
Website accessed 22nd March 2012

Proctor and Gamble“At P&G, safety research using animals has become an exceedingly rare event. It is performed only as a last option, and only after exhausting all other possibilities. When testing is necessary, we make sure such tests are performed humanely, with the highest standards of care, and with the fewest animals possible.”
Website accessed 22nd March 2012

Unilever“We are committed to eliminating animal testing, which most of our products do not, in any case, involve. Our strict internal procedures ensure that testing is only carried out where there is no other option, while we continue to invest in alternative methods.”
Website accessed 22nd March 2012

Avon – “Avon does business in over 100 countries, and some select products may be required by law in a few countries to undergo additional safety testing, which potentially includes animal testing, under the directive of a government or health agency. In these instances, Avon will first attempt to persuade the requesting authority to accept non-animal test data. When those attempts are unsuccessful, Avon must abide by local laws and submit the products for additional testing... In 2011, Avon offered approximately 9,000 products in over 100 countries, and in that year less than 0.3% of these products were tested on animals under the directives of the law in a few countries.”
Website accessed 22nd March 2012

Estee Lauder“We do not conduct animal testing on our products or ingredients, nor ask others to test on our behalf, except when required by law.”
Website accessed 22nd March 2012

Special notice

Body Shop – Their web-site states that “The Body Shop has always believed passionately that animals should not be used for cosmetic testing. We have never tested our products on animals. Similarly, we insist that all our suppliers have not tested their ingredients on animals for cosmetic purposes.”
See website
However it should be noted that L’Oreal is the parent company and they do test on animals.

Urban Decay – Their web-site states that “Urban Decay is, and always has been, a cruelty-free company. You’ll notice that every box bears our cruelty-free credo: “We don’t do animal testing. How could anyone?” We insist on producing beautiful, irreverent, high-end cosmetics without conducting animal testing”.
Website accessed 22nd March 2012
Note: Since November 2012, Urban Decay has been owned by L’Oreal who test on animals.

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